Post-Nasal Drip

The term post-nasal drip is used to describe mucous that drains into the back of the throat instead of disappearing through the nasal passages and out of the nose. This often causes a problem at night when lying down.

Symptoms

The term post-nasal drip is used to describe mucous that drains into the back of the throat instead of disappearing through the nasal passages and out of the nose. This often causes a problem at night when lying down.

Causes

The most common cause of post-nasal drip is an upper respiratory infection such as a cold. In these cases, the post-nasal drip clears up when the infection is resolved.

Natural Therapies

Horseradish is indicated to dry up mucous from the sinus area; it is frequently combined with garlic which has antibiotic properties, and fenugreek which soothes the inflamed mucous membranes of the respiratory tract
Cod liver oil is rich in vitamin A which helps maintain healthy mucous membranes of the nose, throat and eyes
Use the herb Andrographis to reduce the symptoms of your cold and the time taken to recover from it
Echinacea is a herbal medicine indicated to boost your immune system if you are experiencing recurrent upper respiratory infections. The mineral zinc may also be of assistance

Lifestyle Factors

Make sure you drink lots of water, and consider using a humidifier in the bedroom to keep the mucous membranes in your nose, throat and eyes moisturised. This is especially important in winter when the humidity is lower.

Avoid mucous-forming foods such as dairy products, sugar and refined foods. Instead, eat a diet rich in fresh fruit and vegetables and whole grain products.

Don’t eat a large meal just before bed as this can worsen the problem.

Remedies

Airborne allergies such as animal hair, feathers and dust mites may trigger or aggravate post-nasal drip.

Don’t allow pets into your bedroom, and swap your feather doona for hypo-allergenic bedding such as cotton sheets and blankets.

Specialised cleaning may be required to remove dust mites.

Important Notes

Nasal sprays and other over-the-counter decongestant medications are not recommended for long-term use. See your healthcare professional if symptoms persist for longer than seven days.

Visit : www.sharrets.com/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s